Little Orange Suitcase

Apr 15
Simulating this evening’s lunar eclipse in Celestia. The viewpoint is from behind the Moon, looking at the Earth.

Simulating this evening’s lunar eclipse in Celestia. The viewpoint is from behind the Moon, looking at the Earth.


Apr 14

faradaycagefight:

EYE SPY : Sydney City from Glenn Fowler on Vimeo.

Part of our ‘Eye Spy’ series, where we study & explore the world’s cities from above through light & structure. Presented by ambience & cavort.co

facebook.com/ambiencelighting

facebook.com/cavortwithfriends

Melbourne, Chicago, Belgrade, Edinburgh and more to come.

Music: Professor Kliq - ‘Traffic Cars’

#GLORIOUSSYDNEY


70sscifiart:

Rama

70sscifiart:

Rama


(via dafnap)


muspeccoll:

Inspired by uispeccoll, houghtonlib, smithsonianlibraries, and others, we’ve created our first animated gifs! 

These images are from Fragments on the theory and practice of landscape gardening by Humphry Repton (London, 1816).  Repton was England’s first professional landscape gardener, a term he coined himself. Repton and other gardeners of this period sought to shape the landscape without the outward appearance of control, creating “natural” scenery too perfect to exist in nature. 

Repton’s main employment was as a design consultant for wealthy landowners throughout the English countryside, and he used his artistic and writing skills to further his career. When he sketched plans for new landscapes, Repton devised a way to make the illustrations interact with his clients by incorporating overlays which, when closed, show the current state of the property.  The client could lift the flaps to see how his or her estate would look after Repton’s proposed modifications. 

Although Repton took on hundreds of commissions during his thirty-year career, his writings and watercolors may be his most enduring achievements.  His illustrations, along with his written commentary and explanations of his design principles, were collected and published as Observations on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1803) and Fragments on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening (1816). 

MERLIN catalog record

(via houghtonlib)


Apr 10

(via matchtricks)


Apr 8

twinpeakscaptioned:

The pilot episode aired on April 8, 1990.


plummerfernandez:

starting with a simple cube (32 faces on each side), then applying fractal subdivision, smooth, scale, twist, colour and contrast algorithms. 

(via fyprocessing)


beatonna:

Here is a sketch comic I made called Ducks, in five parts.
Part One
Part Two
Part Three
Part Four
Part Five
Ducks is about part of my time working at a mining site in Fort McMurray, the events are from 2008.  It is a complicated place, it is not the same for all, and these are only my own experiences there.  It is a sketch because I want to test how I would tell these stories, and how I feel about sharing them.  A larger work gets talked about from time to time.  It is not a place I could describe in one or two stories.  Ducks is about a lot of things, and among these, it is about environmental destruction in an environment that includes humans.  Thank you for taking the time to read it.
-Kate

beatonna:

Here is a sketch comic I made called Ducks, in five parts.

Part One

Part Two

Part Three

Part Four

Part Five

Ducks is about part of my time working at a mining site in Fort McMurray, the events are from 2008.  It is a complicated place, it is not the same for all, and these are only my own experiences there.  It is a sketch because I want to test how I would tell these stories, and how I feel about sharing them.  A larger work gets talked about from time to time.  It is not a place I could describe in one or two stories.  Ducks is about a lot of things, and among these, it is about environmental destruction in an environment that includes humans.  Thank you for taking the time to read it.

-Kate


fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Last week an earthquake in Chile raised concerns over a possible tsunami in the Pacific. This animation shows a simulation of how waves would spread from the quake’s epicenter over the course of about 30 hours. In the open ocean, a tsunami wave can travel as fast as 800 kph (~500 mph), but due to its very long wavelength and small amplitude (< 1 m), such waves are almost unnoticeable to ships. It’s only near coastal areas, when the water shallows, that the wave train slows down and increases in height. Early in the video, the open ocean wave heights are only centimeters; note how, at the end of the video, the wave run-up heights along the coast are much larger, including the nearly 2 meter waves that impacted Chile. The power of the incoming waves in a tsunami are not their only danger, though; the force of the wave getting pulled back out to sea can also be incredibly destructive. (Video credit: NOAA/NWS/Pacific Tsunami Warning Center; via Wired)


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